Lincoln Blogs


Of Governments and Cows
November 28, 2007, 7:02 pm
Filed under: Books

This is a funny but helpful way to better understand the different forms of government. I found it in the Creation Seminar Notebook (which isn’t really about government) by Dr. Kent Hovind.

Biblical Capitalism: You have two cows. You take care of them and sell the extra milk if you want to.

Feudalism: Your lord lends you two cows. He takes most of the milk and leaves you some.

Pure Socialism: You have two cows. The government takes them and puts them in a barn with everyone else’s cows. You have to take care of all the cows. The government gives you as much milk as you need.

Bureaucratic Socialism: You have two cows. The government takes them and puts them in a barn with everyone else’s cows. They are cared for by ex-chicken farmers. You have to take care of the chickens the government took from the chicken farmers. The government gives you as much milk and eggs as the regulations say you need.

Fascism: You have two cows. The government takes them both, hires you to take care of them, and sells you the milk.

Pure Communism: You have two cows. Your neighbors help you to take care of them, and you share the milk.

Russian Communism: You have two cows. You have to take care of them, but the government takes all the milk.

Cambodian Communism: You have two cows. The government takes them both and shoots you.

Dictatorship: You have two cows. The government takes them both and drafts you.

Pure Democracy: You have two cows. Your neighbors decide who gets the milk.

Representive Democracy: You have two cows. Your neighbors vote for someone to tell you who gets the milk.

American Democracy: The government promises to give you two cows if you vote for it. After the election, the President is impeached for speculating in cow futures. The press dubs the affair “Cowgate.”

British Democracy: You have two cows. You feed the cows sheep brains and they go mad. The government doesn’t do anything.

Bureaucracy: You have two cows. At first the government regulates what you can feed them and when you can milk them. Then it pays you not to milk them. Then it takes both, shoots one, milks the other and pours the milk down the drain. Then it requires you to fill out forms accounting for the missing cows.

Environmentalism: You have two cows. The government bans you from milking or killing them.

Pure Anarchy: You have two cows. Your neighbors riot and kill you for trying to sell the milk.

Libertarian/Anarcho-Capitalism: You have two cows. You sell one and buy a bull.

Clintonomics: You have two cows. The government requires you to take harmonica lessons.

Totalitarianism: You have two cows. The government takes them and denies they ever existed. Milk is banned.

Counter-Culture: Wow, dude, there’s like… these two cows, man. You gotta have some of this milk.

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The Justice of Hell in the ‘Inferno’
November 21, 2007, 3:59 pm
Filed under: Books, School Papers

In Dante’s Inferno, there is an inscription on the gate that leads to Hell. “Justice moved my great maker; God eternal / Wrought me: the power and the unsearchably / High wisdom, and the primal love supernal (III.4-6). This inscription on the gate is completely true, and the motivation of God to create Hell is completely justified.

The inscription on the gate means, simply, that God created Hell as an act of justice. Without it, He could not properly punish sinners, who deserve nothing less. Although Hell was created as a severe punishment, the inscription says that God had wisdom and love.

Many people ask why God would create such an awful place as Hell. The gate of hell answers this question. Without hell, we would not see God’s justice. And if there were no Hell, we would not see God’s mercy, grace, and love either, for there would be nothing to save us from.

This creation of Hell is unlike any other creation, in that it is an eternal place of horror that many would call bad, but that is, once considered more carefully, a just place. It is utterly unique in its contradictory, yet co-existing traits.

This wisdom of the justice of hell is demonstrated throughout the book. All who are in hell have committed dreadful sins, but none are repentant. Consider Vanni Fucci, who is in hell and hates and curses God. He is obviously not sorry for his sins, and does not think he deserves his punishment. In reality, it would be absurd for him not have to endure some sort of punishment.

Jonathan Edwards once said, “The sight of hell torments will exalt the happiness of the saints forever…. Can the believing Father in Heaven be happy with his unbelieving children in Hell?… I tell you, yea! Such will be his sense of justice that it will increase rather than diminish his bliss.”

So we see that the creation of hell was not an evil act, but a just act that shows the justice and mercy of God. Without Hell, sinners who deserve punishment would not face justice. God’s mercy would also be hidden, since none would be punished, and therefore none saved.