Lincoln Blogs


Thomas Hooker and the Fundamental Orders of Connecticut
September 15, 2008, 12:31 pm
Filed under: History, School Papers

Thomas Hooker was a prominent Puritan and Colonial leader who is well known for his role in founding Connecticut and creating the Fundamental Orders of Connecticut in the 1600s. He was a very pious man with strong character, and was once called “The Light of the Western Churches and the Pillar of Connecticut Colony.” An independent thinker, he became a Puritan and devoted himself to God. His influence on the American colonies was great; in 1636 he and his congregation formed the Hartford colony in the Connecticut area. Later, Hartford and two other colonies merged to form Connecticut. Hooker was also significant in the future of the United States, as he assisted in creating the Fundamental Orders of Connecticut.

The Fundamental Orders of Connecticut is considered to be the first written Constitution in the Western tradition, and many of its ideas are seen in the American Constitution. Perhaps the most important point in the Fundamental Orders of Connecticut is the first, which lays out the method for electing the officials of the Colony, and the duties of these officials.

The first [of two yearly assemblies] shall be called the Court of Election, wherein shall be yearly chosen from time to time, so many Magistrates and other public Officers as shall be found requisite: Whereof one to be chosen Governor, which being chosen and sworn according to an Oath recorded for that purpose, shall have the power to administer justice according to the Laws here established, and for want thereof, according to the Rule of the Word of God.

This section is important because it describes a means of electing official that is still used today in America. Its ideas were used in the United States Constitution over one hundred years later. The concept of democracy is one of the things that makes America great, and it is and was very important in the colony of Connecticut, and the United States of America. This section in the Fundamental Orders also speaks of “the Rule of the Word of God,” which shows that the very earliest founders of the United States believed the Bible, and used it as their basis for all of their actions.

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3 Comments so far
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Thomas Hooker was a prominent Puritan…”

Where does this Puritan nonsense come from?

The fact is it was due to the Puritan invasion of Mass and the construction of their Massachusetts Bay Colony near already existing Plymouth that Hooker led his band south to settle what became Connecticut.

While not a Mayflower Pilgrim, Hooker was indeed a part of the same group, having earlier fled England for Holland in search of religious liberty.

The Mayflower Pilgrims, nor the original settlers of Plymouth Colony were Puritans.
Indeed, after the Rev. John Lothrop was “exiled” (escaped) to America it was upon his arrival and being greeted as a “fine Puritan” that led to his almost immediate departure for Cape Cod (he was horrified at the very notion) where he settled the Town of Barnstable.

http://www.sail1620.org/history/articles/91-pilgrims-not-puritans.html

The Puritans were a disgusting & despicable lot and not worthy of discourse with upright men; Thomas Hooker was NOT a Puritan.

Comment by Doug Hageman

To Mr. Hageman:
According to your website it says that the Mayflower Pilgrims and the founders of the Plymouth Colony were separatists. If you do not know, separatists are extremist PURITANS.
Setting all things aside, you absolutely have no right whatsoever to call them “a disgusting and despicable lot and not worthy of discourse with upright men..” whether its true or not (how would we really know anyways, history is biased and there are very little Puritans left). No matter how “disgusting and despicable” they were, the United States of America would be utterly different without their existence.
You should try an unbiased website before you go making assumptions.

Comment by Penelope L.

Hi

Comment by eueujehfjurj




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